Celebrating 50 years of Beatlemania with "Fab Four"-related scholarly works

Web of Science citation analysis reveals the significant impact the Beatles had on the global scholarly research landscape
Beatles play on Ed Sullivan

50 years ago, four young musicians from Liverpool, England appeared on the global stage and took the world by musical storm. To celebrate the Beatles' rise to worldwide fame, our analysts conducted a search of the Web of Science, our premier scientific search and discovery platform, to identify hundreds of pertinent papers devoted to the band, their music, and their continuing influence.

From that list, 10 were selected to demonstrate the academic attention the Beatles continue to inspire decades after worldwide Beatles Mania first took hold in 1964, the same year the Web of Science originated.

The select papers represent a range of academic disciplines, including those in the social sciences and the arts & humanities. A psychological study, for example, employs Beatles' song titles and lyrics to investigate aspects of memory and recall in a group of undergraduate students. Other papers consider the Beatles' work in terms of its lyrical and musical style, as well as examine the nature of the band's creativity and collaboration, while others assess the Beatles and their place in the political landscape.

Here is the listing of the ten papers selected:

  1. I.E. Hyman, D.C. Rubin, "Memorabeatlia — A naturalistic study of long-term memory," Memory & Cognition, 18 (2): 205-14, 1990.
  2. C. Whissell, "Traditional and emotional stylometric analysis of the songs of Beatles Paul McCartney and John Lennon," Computers and the Humanities, 30 (3): 257-65, 1996.
  3. S. Cohen, "More than the Beatles: Popular music, tourism and urban regeneration" [book chapter], Tourists and Tourism: Identifying with People and Places , ed. by S. Abram, et al.,) 71-90, 1997.
  4. R.J. Kruse, "Imagining Strawberry Fields as a place of pilgrimage," Area, 35 (2): 154-62, 2003.
  5. W. Everett, "Fantastic remembrance in Lennon, John ‘Strawberry Fields Forever' and ‘Julia' and voice-leading in selected Beatles songs," Musical Quarterly, 72 (3): 360-93, 1986.
  6. G. Clydesdale, "Creativity and competition: The Beatles," Creativity Research Journal, 18 (2): 129-39, 2006.
  7. J. Platoff, "John Lennon, ‘Revolution,' and the politics of musical reception," Journal of Musicology, 22 (2): 241-67, 2005.
  8. A. Elliott, "Celebrity and political psychology: Remembering Lennon," Political Psychology, 19 (4): 833-52, 1998.
  9. S. Daniels, "Suburban pastoral: Strawberry Fields Forever and sixties memory," Cultural Geographies, 13 (1): 28-54, 2006.
  10. N. Wagner, "Domestication of the blue note in the Beatles' songs," Music Theory Spectrum, 25 (2): 353-65, 2003.